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Guide, Hearing and Assistance Dogs Act 2009 – 1 July 2014

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Guide, Hearing and Assistance Dogs Act 2009 – 1 July 2014

Guide, Hearing and Assistance Dogs Regulation 2009 – 1 October 2015

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Despite any other Act, a person with a disability who relies on a guide, hearing or assistance dog to reduce the person’s need for support (or an approved trainer, employee trainer or puppy carer) may be accompanied by a guide, hearing or assistance dog in a place of accommodation, public place or public passenger vehicle. A person exercising control of a place of accommodation must not refuse to rent accommodation at the place to an accompanied handler because the accompanied handler, while in the place, would be accompanied by a certified guide, hearing, assistance or trainee support dog. A person exercising control of a public place or public passenger vehicle must not refuse entry to, or permission to be in, the place or vehicle to an accompanied handler who is complying with the identification procedure. There are some exceptions to the last mentioned rule – see section 7 and Schedule 1 of the Act. For the definition of ‘disability’, refer to section 5 of the Act. For the definitions of ‘accompanied handler’, ‘place of accommodation’, ‘public passenger vehicle’ and ‘public place’, refer to section 6 of the Act. For what constitutes an ‘identification procedure’, refer to section 12 of the Act. For the definitions of ‘guide dog’, ‘hearing dog’, ‘assistance dog’ and ‘puppy carer’, refer to Schedule 2 of the Act.

  • Sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 12A, 13, Schedules 1, 2; Regulation 5

An individual or corporation may apply, in the approved form, to the government for guide dog trainer approval, hearing dog trainer approval or assistance dog trainer approval. For suitability matters, refer to section 14 of the Act. A person is generally suitable for approval if the person is able to: train reliable guide, hearing or assistance dogs that are (i) able to perform identifiable physical tasks and behaviours for the benefit of a person with a disability; and (ii) safe and effective in public places and public passenger vehicles; and select dogs that are able to meet the individual needs of a person with a disability; and provide ongoing and regular support to the handlers of the guide, hearing or assistance dogs trained by the person. When making the approval decision, the government will refer to subsections 17(2) and (3) of the Act. An approved trainer will be provided with an identity card pursuant to section 52 of the Act.

  • Sections 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 31, 32, 52, 53, 56, 59, 61; Regulations 7, 8, 9, 13

An approved guide dog trainer may only certify a guide dog for a person with a disability if the dog is able to be used as a guide by a person with disability attributable to a vision impairment; and otherwise complies with section 36 of the Act. For certification of hearing dogs, refer to section 37 of the Act. For certification of assistance dogs, refer to section 38 of the Act.

  • Sections 36, 37, 38, 39

A person with a disability who relies on a guide, hearing or assistance dog may apply, in the approved form, to the government for a handler’s identity card. The eligibility requirements for the application are provided by section 40 of the Act.

  • Sections 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 50; Regulations 10, 11, 12
Reason for law

To assist people with a disability who rely on guide, hearing or assistance dogs to have independent access to the community; and to ensure the quality and accountability of guide, hearing and assistance dog training services. (Section 3)

Relevant links

Guide, hearing and assistance dogs [Queensland Government]

Guide, hearing and assistance dogs [Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services]

Media statement

New Guide, Hearing and Assistance Dogs Act 2009 starts today

Critique

N/A

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PLEASE NOTE: The information published on this webpage may be out-of-date. Please compare the currency date of the Act/Regulation against that published on the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website. If you require access to Commonwealth statute law, please visit the ComLaw website. If you require access to the local council laws (by-laws), please visit the Local laws database.

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