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Interactive Gambling (Player Protection) Act 1998 – 28 May 2014

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Interactive Gambling (Player Protection) Act 1998 – 28 May 2014

Interactive Gambling (Player Protection) Regulation 1998 – 1 July 2015

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A licensed provider (of interactive gambling) may only register a person as a player on receipt of an application for registration in an approved form. A person is not eligible for registration as a player unless the person produces evidence of the person’s identity, place of residence, and that the person is at least 18 years of age. A person may be registered as a restricted player (with account restrictions) then after 2 months, as an unrestricted player. For the definition of ‘interactive gambling’, refer to the Schedule 3 dictionary.

  • Sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 17, 18, 19, 20A, 22A, Schedule 3; Regulations 3A, 4A, 4B

In most instances, a licensed provider must not accept a wager from a player in an authorised game unless a player’s account has been established in the name of the player and there are adequate funds in the account to cover the amount of the wager. For the definition of ‘authorised game’, refer to section 12 of the Act. For the definition of ‘wager’, refer to the Schedule 3 dictionary.

  • Sections 7, 12, 20, 21, Schedule 3; Regulation 4

A player who participates in an authorised game must comply with rules of the game as notified to the player under the conditions on which the game is authorised.

  • Section 22

A person must not advertise that premises are available for playing interactive games or seek to obtain a commercial advantage from the use of premises for playing interactive games.

  • Section 23

A person may apply in the approved form to the government for an interactive gambling licence (i.e. to become a licensed provider). If a licence is granted, it cannot be transferred. A licensed provider must pay licence fees, interactive gambling tax, and comply with any conduct rules set by the government for authorised gaming.

  • Sections 11, 13, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 37, 38, 41, 42, 60, 61, 65, 66, 67, 69, 70, 71, 72, 88, 89, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 100, 112, 113, 114, 120, 121, 122, 123, 125, 127, 128, 133, 134, 135, 138, 139, 140, 143, 144, 145, 146, 149, 150, 162, 163; Regulations 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 19, 19A, Schedule 2

A licensed provider must, at the request of an unrestricted player in whose name a player’s account is established, remit funds standing to the credit of the account as directed by the player no later than the first business day after the request is received.

  • Section 132

A registered player may, by written notice to a licensed provider, set a limit on the amount the player may wager.

  • Section 136

A person who is registered with a licensed provider as a player may give to the licensed provider a notice in the approved form asking the licensed provider to prohibit the person from participating as a player in authorised games conducted by the licensed provider.

  • Sections 137, 137A, 137G, 137H, 137J

A licensed provider may give a player they believe is a problem gambler a notice prohibiting the person from participating as a player in authorised games conducted by the licensed provider. For the definition of ‘problem gambler’, refer to the Schedule 3 dictionary.

  • Sections 7, 137C, 137D, 137E, 137F, 137G, 137H, 137J, Schedule 3

If a player in an authorised game conducted by a licensed provider wins a monetary prize, the licensed provider must immediately credit the amount of the prize to the player.

  • Sections 156, 158, 159

If a player in an authorised game conducted by a licensed provider wins a non-monetary prize, or a player without a player’s account wins a monetary prize, the provider must: (a) have the prize delivered personally or by post to the player; or (b) give the player written notice of an address in Queensland at which the prize may be collected.

  • Sections 156, 157, 158, 159; Regulations 14, 15, 16, 17

A person must not advertise an interactive game in Queensland unless the game is an authorised game. In addition, A person must not advertise an authorised game in Queensland without approval of the relevant authorised provider. For the definition of ‘authorised provider’, refer to section 11 of the Act.

  • Sections 11, 164, 183

A person who advertises an authorised game must take reasonable steps to ensure the advertisement is not indecent or offensive; is based on fact; and is not false, deceptive or misleading in a material particular.

  • Section 165

A person may make a complaint to a licensed provider about the conduct of an authorised game by the licensed provider.

  • Section 167

A person must not cheat in relation to an authorised game.

  • Section 169

An employee of a licensed provider must not take part in an authorised game if directly involved in functions related to the conduct of the game.

  • Section 173

A licensed provider must not allow a minor to participate in operations related to the conduct of authorised games.

  • Sections 179, 180

A person must not participate in an authorised game under a name or designation that is obscene, indecent or offensive.

  • Section 181

A licensed provider or an employee or other person engaged in duties related to the conduct of an authorised game must not, without authorisation, disclose information about the name, or other identifying particulars, of a player.

  • Section 184
Reason for law

To ensure that, on balance, the State and the community as a whole benefit from interactive gambling. (Section 3)

Relevant links

Gaming [Queensland Government]
Forms and fees

Gaming [Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation]

Gaming research [Department of Justice and Attorney-General]

Problem Gambling [Australian Government]

Relationships Australia Queensland

Critique

Section 170 contains the term ‘utters’. This term may not be understood by members of the public.

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PLEASE NOTE: The information published on this webpage may be out-of-date. Please compare the currency date of the Act/Regulation against that published on the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website. If you require access to Commonwealth statute law, please visit the ComLaw website. If you require access to the local council laws (by-laws), please visit the Local laws database.

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