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Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Act 2003 – 6 December 2016

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Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Act 2003 – 6 December 2016

Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014 – 22 August 2014

Survey and Mapping Infrastructure (Survey Standards) Notice 2015 – 1 July 2015

Survey and Mapping Infrastructure (Survey Standards—Requirements for Mining Tenures) Notice (No. 1) 2011 – 11 November 2011

Quick to view summary

The government may make written standards for surveying to achieve an acceptable level of survey quality. For the definition of ‘survey quality’, refer to the Schedule of the Act.

  • Sections 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, Schedule; Regulation 13 of the Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014

A surveyor, surveying associate or surveying graduate must comply with each relevant survey standard in carrying out a survey, unless the person has a reasonable excuse. Note: Regulation 6 of the Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014 states that a survey must be carried out in a way that achieves the survey’s intended purpose. Regulations 9, 16, 19 and 21 impose additional requirements for plans of cadastral survey. For the definition of ‘survey’, refer to the Schedule of the Act.

  • Sections 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, Schedule; Regulations 2, 6, 9, 16, 19, 21, Schedule 2

If a surveyor, surveying associate or surveying graduate places a permanent survey mark in carrying out a survey (other than a State survey), the person responsible for preparing the plan of survey must give the government a copy of the plan of survey in the approved form. For the timing requirements, refer to subsection 15(3) of the Act. A similar rule applies to cadastral surveyors when placing a survey mark, pursuant to section 16 of the Act. For the definitions of ‘permanent survey mark’ and ‘plan’, refer to the Schedule of the Act.

  • Sections 5, 15, 16, Schedule; Regulation 21 of the Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014

A surveyor may place a permanent survey mark on freehold land with the consent of the owner/occupier of the land.

  • Sections 21, 22, 23, 24

A person must not interfere with a survey mark the existence of which the person knows or ought reasonably to know, unless they are in compliance with section 42 of the Act. For the definition of ‘survey mark’, refer to the Schedule of the Act.

  • Sections 5, 42, 43, 44, Schedule; Regulation 14 of the Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014

If a surveyor, surveying associate or surveying graduate becomes aware of the disrepair, destruction or removal of a recognised permanent survey mark, the person must give the government written notice of the matter.

  • Section 45

The recording, in the State digital cadastral dataset, of information about a parcel of land does not create or affect an interest in the land.

  • Section 47

If a surveyor intends carrying out a survey, the surveyor may be obligated to give the government written notice complying with section 55 of the Act (announce intention, ask for specifications, etc).

  • Sections 3, 5, 55, Schedule
Reason for law

To provide for developing, maintaining and improving the State survey and mapping infrastructure. (Section 3)

The State survey and mapping infrastructure is of value to the community because it contributes to the State’s economic, environmental and social development. (Regulation 3 of the Survey and Mapping Infrastructure Regulation 2014)

Relevant links

Surveying [Queensland Government]
Surveying standards and forms
Survey plan research

Digital cadastral data [Business and Industry Portal]
Historical Cadastral maps [Queensland Government]
Survey control register Queensland [Queensland Government Data]

Queensland Spatial Information Council [Queensland Government]
Queensland Spatial Catalogue – QSpatial

GISday

PSMA Australia

International Map Industry Association

Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM)

Commonwealth Association of Surveying and Land Economy (CASLE)

Commonwealth Geographical Bureau (CGB)

International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)

Critique

N/A

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PLEASE NOTE: The information published on this webpage may be out-of-date. Please compare the currency date of the Act/Regulation against that published on the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website. If you require access to Commonwealth statute law, please visit the ComLaw website. If you require access to the local council laws (by-laws), please visit the Local laws database.

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